Unesco World Heritage sites in images: Nalanda, Chandigarh Capitol on list - Firstpost
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Unesco World Heritage sites in images: Nalanda, Chandigarh Capitol on list


Istanbul: The World Heritage Committee on Sunday evening agreed to put 12 new sites on the World Heritage List before ending its 40th session in Turkey's Istanbul city.

From India, Khangchendzonga National Park (KNP) in Sikkim was named a world heritage site by the committee. In addition to this, Nalanda University in Bihar and The Capitol Complex in Chandigarh have also made it to the list.

With nine others already approved on Friday, the session has placed a total of 21 out of 27 nominations for this year on the prestigious list, Xinhua news agency reported. With the 21 newly added — 12 cultural sites, six natural and three mixed ones — the heritage list has now 1,052 sites in 165 countries.

The state of conservation of 155 properties was examined as well during the session, with five in Libya inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger along with one in Uzbekistan and another in Mali. Meanwhile, one site in Georgia was removed from the list of endangered sites, while the site of Nan Madol, or the Ceremonial Centre of Eastern Micronesia, was simultaneously inscribed on the World Heritage List and on the List in Danger.

The 40th session started on July 10 and was cut short by four days due to the outbreak of a coup attempt in Turkey on Friday night. The heritage committee, a panel under the Unesco, decided to discuss the unfinished items on the agenda at another meeting slated to be held in Paris later.

The 41st session is slated for July 2017 in Krakow, Poland. The heritage committee was formed in 1977 to enforce the World Heritage Convention and manage the heritage list created based on the convention.

Itching to travel? You should take a look at these beautiful world heritage sites:

Inscribed as @unesco #WorldHeritage today: Zuojiang Huashan Rock Art Cultural Landscape (People’s Republic of #China)—Located on the steep cliffs in the border regions of southwest China, these 38 sites of rock art illustrate the life and rituals of the Luoyue people. They date from the period around the 5th century BCE to the 2nd century CE. In a surrounding landscape of karst, rivers and plateaux, they depict ceremonies which have been interpreted as portraying the bronze drum culture once prevalent across southern China. This cultural landscape is the only remains of this culture today. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

Inscribed as @unesco #WorldHeritage today: Archaeological Site of Nalanda Mahavihara (Nalanda University) at Nalanda, Bihar (#India) – The Nalanda Mahavihara site is in the State of Bihar, in north-eastern India. It comprises the archaeological remains of a monastic and scholastic institution dating from the 3rd century BCE to the 13th century CE. It includes stupas, shrines, viharas (residential and educational buildings) and important art works in stucco, stone and metal. Nalanda stands out as the most ancient university of the Indian Subcontinent. It engaged in the organized transmission of knowledge over an uninterrupted period of 800 years. The historical development of the site testifies to the development of Buddhism into a religion and the flourishing of monastic and educational traditions. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

Inscribed as @unesco #WorldHeritage today: The Persian Qanat (Islamic Republic of #Iran)—Throughout the arid regions of Iran, agricultural and permanent settlements are supported by the ancient qanat system of tapping alluvial aquifers at the heads of valleys and conducting the water along underground tunnels by gravity, often over many kilometres. The eleven qanats representing this system include rest areas for workers, water reservoirs and watermills. The traditional communal management system still in place allows equitable and sustainable water sharing and distribution. The qanats provide exceptional testimony to cultural traditions and civilizations in desert areas with an arid climate. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

Inscribed as @unesco #WorldHeritage today: Nan Madol: Ceremonial Centre of Eastern Micronesia (Federated States of #Micronesia) – Nan Madol is a series of 99 artificial islets off the south-east coast of Pohnpeithat that were constructed with walls of basalt and coral boulders. These islets harbour the remains of stone palaces, temples, tombs and residential domains built between 1200 and 1500 CE. These ruins represent the ceremonial centre of the Saudeleur dynasty, a vibrant period in Pacific Island culture. The huge scale of the edifices, their technical sophistication and the concentration of megalithic structures bear testimony to complex social and religious practices of the island societies of the period. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

Inscribed as@unesco #WorldHeritage today: Stećci – Medieval Tombstones Graveyards (#Bosnia and Herzegovina, #Croatia, #Montenegro, #Serbia) – This serial property combines 30 sites, located in Bosnia and Herzegovina, western Serbia, western Montenegro and central and southern Croatia, representing these cemeteries and regionally distinctive medieval tombstones, or stećci. The cemeteries, which date from the 12th to 16th centuries CE, are laid out in rows, as was the common custom in Europe from the Middle Ages. The stećci are mostly carved from limestone. They feature a wide range of decorative motifs and inscriptions that represent iconographic continuities within medieval Europe as well as locally distinctive traditions. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

A visit to Le Corb's city #openhandmonument #chandigarhcapitolcomplex #lecorbusier #indiaexchange2015

A photo posted by Hilette (@hilette_lindeque) on

#nanmadol #pohnpeisurfclub

A photo posted by Pohnpei Surf Club (@pohnpei_surf_club) on

Inscribed as @unesco #WorldHeritage today: The Persian Qanat (Islamic Republic of #Iran)—Throughout the arid regions of Iran, agricultural and permanent settlements are supported by the ancient qanat system of tapping alluvial aquifers at the heads of valleys and conducting the water along underground tunnels by gravity, often over many kilometres. The eleven qanats representing this system include rest areas for workers, water reservoirs and watermills. The traditional communal management system still in place allows equitable and sustainable water sharing and distribution. The qanats provide exceptional testimony to cultural traditions and civilizations in desert areas with an arid climate. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates on the 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee in #Istanbul @UNESCO #worldheritage

A photo posted by UNESCO (@unesco) on

#VillaSavoye #LeCorbusier #Architecture

A photo posted by Cristiano Morelli (@cristiano_morelli) on

First Published On : Jul 18, 2016 11:26 IST

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