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Japan marks 72nd anniversary of Hiroshima atomic bombing amid tensions with nuclear-armed North Korea

Japan on Sunday marked 72 years since the world’s first nuclear attack on Hiroshima, with the nation’s traditional contradictions over atomic weapons again coming into focus. AP

Japan on Sunday marked 72 years of the world’s first nuclear attack on Hiroshima, with the nation’s traditional contradictions over atomic weapons again coming into focus. AP

Japan suffered two nuclear attacks at the end of the World War II by the United States -- in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 and in Nagasaki three days later. The bombings claimed the lives of 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 74,000 people in Nagasaki. Some died immediately while others succumbed to injuries or radiation-related illnesses weeks, months and years later. AP

The bombings claimed the lives of 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 74,000 people in Nagasaki. Some died immediately, while others succumbed to radiation-related illnesses weeks, months and years later. AP

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Japanese officials have criticised the UN Nuclear Weapon Ban Treaty as deepening a divide between countries with and without nuclear arms. None of the nine countries that possess nuclear weapons took part in the negotiations or vote on the treaty. AP

The anniversary came after Japan sided with nuclear powers Britain, France and the US to dismiss a UN treaty banning atomic weapons, which was rejected for ignoring the security threats such as North Korea. Japan is the only country to have suffered atomic attacks, in 1945. AP

The anniversary came after Japan sided with nuclear powers Britain, France and the US to dismiss a UN treaty banning atomic weapons, which was rejected for ignoring the security threats such as North Korea. Japan is the only country to have suffered atomic attacks, in 1945. AP

Many in Japan feel the attacks amount to war crimes and atrocities because they targeted civilians and due to the unprecedented destructive nature of the weapons. But many Americans believe they hastened the end of a bloody conflict, and ultimately saved lives, thus justifying the bombings. AP

Many in Japan feel the attacks amount to war crimes and atrocities because they targeted civilians and due to the unprecedented destructive nature of the weapons. But many Americans believe they hastened the end of a bloody conflict, and ultimately saved lives, thus justifying the bombings. AP


Published Date: Aug 06, 2017 13:42 PM | Updated Date: Aug 06, 2017 14:58 PM

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