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Gurdwara shooter identified, motive still unknown

The gunman suspected of killing six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsinlater shot dead during an exchange of gunfire with police on Sunday, was identified as Wade Michael Page.

Page was a 40-year-old white man who once served in the military.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is probing the attack at the gurdwara in a Milwaukee suburb as an act of domestic terrorism but no motive has been determined.

CBS News reported, Page served in the US Army for about six years. He was enlisted in April 1992 and given a less-than-honorable discharge in October 1998. He served at Fort Bliss, Texas, in the psychological operations unit in 1994, and was last stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, attached to the psychological operations unit.

AP

Few details emerged about Page, after his Cudahy duplex apartment was searched by police hours after the shooting in Milwaukee’s Oak Creek suburb. Records show that Page was the registered inhabitant at this  apartment in South Milwaukee from December 2011 until the present.

He was earlier described as white, single, in his 40s and an Army veteran. Tattoos on the body of the slain gunman and certain biographical details led the FBI to treat the attack at a Milwaukee-area temple as an act of domestic terrorism. Eyewitness said that the shooter had a “9/11 tattoo” on his arm.

Kurt Weins, who lives in the 3700 block of E Holmes Avenue in Cudahy, said he had rented the property to a man he believed to be from Chicago with no record of violence in Wisconsin, Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reported.

Authorities did not tell Weins whether his tenant was the shooting suspect, but the description matches that of the man that sources said was the shooter, the report said.

ABC News, citing unnamed sources, said it was told the shootings were the work of a “white supremacist” or “skinhead”.

Weins said he ran a thorough check on the man, whom he would not name because police told him not to disclose the name. “I had him checked out and he definitely checked out,” Weins said. The man appeared to be something of a loner, he said.