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Tim Burton

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When it was announced that Hollywood was rebooting <em>Planet of the Apes</em>, no one had any interest. No one wanted to see an action movie featuring monkeys. The whole business looked truly stupid in Tim Burton's 2001 movie and there seemed to be only a slim chance of improvement. But then Rupert Wyatt's<em> Rise of the Planet of the Apes</em> came along, and it turned out to be a surprisingly well made film. It wasn't just an 'origin story', it was a layered and at times moving film with an ape named Caesar as the (anti) hero. And if you liked the first film and thought there was no need of a sequel or assumed there was no way a sequel could be any better than part one, I have five words for you: prepare to be blown away. <em>Dawn of the Planet of the Apes</em> is an incredible, astonishing achievement. The easiest, laziest simile to describe it would be to say it is the best sequel since<em> The Dark Knight,</em> but it is that. It left me with the the same maddening, crystalline pure cinematic thrill as <em>The Dark Knight.</em> Let me explain now why I need Caesar's poster and director Matt Reeves's autograph at the earliest. Generally, a Hollywood sequel is an attempt to steal some money from you - there is little effort involved in the filmmaking and tons of money thrown in marketing. <em>Dawn of the Planet of the Apes</em> is not that kind of a sequel. This movie was made by a bunch of ballsy people, who have done their damnedest to make sure you have a special experience at the cinema. Right from the opening scene, featuring a close up shot of Caesar's eyes, it becomes clear that this is not a standard issue action movie. It's different in style and tone compared to its predecessor, and there is a tense, powerful surge of emotion throughout its narrative. There are no dialogues in the first 15 minutes, yet Reeves weaves the narrative smoothly, establishing that it's been ten years since the previous film. Now, the humans are dead and the Apes have colonised the world. We follow Caesar's life as the leader of the apes. We're introduced to the other characters in his colony, like his son River, his lieutenant Rocket, his advisor Koba, his friend Maurice and Rocket's son, Ash. I remember the names of these relatively minor characters - that's how gripping this film is.

When it was announced that Hollywood was rebooting <em>Planet of the Apes</em>, no one had any interest. No one wanted to see an action movie featuring monkeys. The whole business looked truly stupid in Tim Burton\'s 2001 movie and there seemed to be only a slim chance of improvement. But then Rupert Wyatt\'s<em> Rise of the Planet of the Apes</em> came along, and it turned out to be a surprisingly well made film. It wasn\'t just an \'origin story\', it was a layered and at times moving film with an ape named Caesar as the (anti) hero. And if you liked the first film and thought there was no need of a sequel or assumed there was no way a sequel could be any better than part one, I have five words for you: prepare to be blown away. <em>Dawn of the Planet of the Apes</em> is an incredible, astonishing achievement. The easiest, laziest simile to describe it would be to say it is the best sequel since<em> The Dark Knight,</em> but it is that. It left me with the the same maddening, crystalline pure cinematic thrill as <em>The Dark Knight.</em> Let me explain now why I need Caesar\'s poster and director Matt Reeves\'s autograph at the earliest. Generally, a Hollywood sequel is an attempt to steal some money from you - there is little effort involved in the filmmaking and tons of money thrown in marketing. <em>Dawn of the Planet of the Apes</em> is not that kind of a sequel. This movie was made by a bunch of ballsy people, who have done their damnedest to make sure you have a special experience at the cinema. Right from the opening scene, featuring a close up shot of Caesar\'s eyes, it becomes clear that this is not a standard issue action movie. It\'s different in style and tone compared to its predecessor, and there is a tense, powerful surge of emotion throughout its narrative. There are no dialogues in the first 15 minutes, yet Reeves weaves the narrative smoothly, establishing that it\'s been ten years since the previous film. Now, the humans are dead and the Apes have colonised the world. We follow Caesar\'s life as the leader of the apes. We\'re introduced to the other characters in his colony, like his son River, his lieutenant Rocket, his advisor Koba, his friend Maurice and Rocket\'s son, Ash. I remember the names of these relatively minor characters - that\'s how gripping this film is. [caption id=attachment_1611957 align=alignleft width=380 View full gallery
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