You are here: Home » Topics » » Rituparno Ghosh

Rituparno Ghosh

GALLERY

By Premankur Biswas Within the first few frames of Rituparno Ghosh's last directorial offering,<em> Satyanweshi</em>, the lead character, Byomkesh Bakshi, likens a detective story to a hunting expedition. The eye for detail, the logical analysis of facts and the serendipitous connection between time and action characterises the success of both, he says. But what if the hunter or the writer is not there to make the final killing and tie the strings at the end? Does it spell doom for the whole enterprise? The answer to this lies somewhere in the middle in case of<em> Satywaneshi</em>, the shooting of which was completed by the director before his untimely demise but whose post production was handled by his core team of Arghyakamal Mitra (editor), Debjyoti Mishra (music director), Debabrata Dutta (associate director) and Avik Mukhopadhyay (cinematographer). While Rituparno Ghosh's intrinsic ability to create mood out of few basic props are in evidence here (albeit in patches), there are times when you feel that certain crucial strands of the film were lost during the unfortunate change of hands. The best way to describe <em>Satywaneshi</em> is to call it a mellow psychological thriller. It's filmed mostly indoors, soaked in a sense of induced melancholia and lit by flickering candles and soft afternoon light. It takes the much-loved <em>bhadralok</em> Bengali detective Byomkesh Bakshi (Sujoy Ghosh) and his writer friend Ajit (Anindya Chattopadhyay) to a palace in North Bengal. Here, a distraught king Himangshu (Indraneil Dasgupta) is desperate to convince his distrusting wife, Alaka (Arpita Chatterjee) that he has no hand in the disappearance of her friend and confidant, the palace librarian (Anirban Ghosh). The presence of a young widow (Anandi Ghose) and her Brahmin father (Sibaji Bandyopadhyay), both asylum seekers in the palace, makes things murkier.

<strong>By Premankur Biswas</strong> Within the first few frames of Rituparno Ghosh\'s last directorial offering,<em> Satyanweshi</em>, the lead character, Byomkesh Bakshi, likens a detective story to a hunting expedition. The eye for detail, the logical analysis of facts and the serendipitous connection between time and action characterises the success of both, he says. But what if the hunter or the writer is not there to make the final killing and tie the strings at the end? Does it spell doom for the whole enterprise? The answer to this lies somewhere in the middle in case of<em> Satywaneshi</em>, the shooting of which was completed by the director before his untimely demise but whose post production was handled by his core team of Arghyakamal Mitra (editor), Debjyoti Mishra (music director), Debabrata Dutta (associate director) and Avik Mukhopadhyay (cinematographer). While Rituparno Ghosh\'s intrinsic ability to create mood out of few basic props are in evidence here (albeit in patches), there are times when you feel that certain crucial strands of the film were lost during the unfortunate change of hands. The best way to describe <em>Satywaneshi</em> is to call it a mellow psychological thriller. It\'s filmed mostly indoors, soaked in a sense of induced melancholia and lit by flickering candles and soft afternoon light. It takes the much-loved <em>bhadralok</em> Bengali detective Byomkesh Bakshi (Sujoy Ghosh) and his writer friend Ajit (Anindya Chattopadhyay) to a palace in North Bengal. Here, a distraught king Himangshu (Indraneil Dasgupta) is desperate to convince his distrusting wife, Alaka (Arpita Chatterjee) that he has no hand in the disappearance of her friend and confidant, the palace librarian (Anirban Ghosh). The presence of a young widow (Anandi Ghose) and her Brahmin father (Sibaji Bandyopadhyay), both asylum seekers in the palace, makes things murkier. [caption id=attachment_1089909 align=alignleft width=380 View full gallery
LIVE