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Rahul Gandhi

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Rahul Gandhi is not a popular man. Each week brings fresh news of an anti-Rahul rebellion, and the narrative remains pretty much the same: Helpless Sonia fails to hold together leaders angry at clueless Rahul; Congress party implosion imminent. (We at Firstpost have served up numerous examples of the same here, here and here) In the midst of this constant doomsday-mongering then, it is refreshing to stumble upon someone who has a completely different view of the same set of rather dire circumstances, as does Rajesh Ramachandran in the Economic Times. <a href=http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/38887183.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&amp;utm_medium=text&amp;utm_campaign=cppst%20 target=_blank>His column's title</a>, Will Rahul Gandhi get his mojo back? is a bit misleading as it is unclear whether Rahul everfound his mojo at any point of his long but rocky career -- except perhaps the very early honeymoon period when he first became an MP. But titles aside, the column does offer two important departures from the now staple Rahul narrative. One, there is a genuine ideological difference between Rahul and the Congress leadership. This isn't just a matter of naive Rahul being led by the nose by his 'NGO-type' advisers. There was good reason why he recently held his own organizational review without inviting the usual suspects on board, argues Ramachandran: <blockquote><em>There was no point in bringing them on board anyway because his poor-only agenda would have never gone down well with the traditional leadership. These leaders have thrived on the leadership opportunities offered by the umbrella party. And they firmly believe that Congress' success lies in being everything for everyone, instead of turning it into a 'Dalit-minority-poor' party. So, the leaders have all shuttered their shops and have gone into some sort of a hibernation.</em></blockquote> The column takes a far more cynical view of Rahul's internal critics, framing them as career politicians whose 'rebellion' is really an unseemly power grab for the chief minister post, be it in Assam or Maharashtra. None of them are quite as concerned about the Lok Sabha results as they pretend to be, writes Ramachandran: Congressmen without power are like retired faujis. If they don't join some other job, they just sleep off their hangover waiting for their next round of burrapegs and pension.

Rahul Gandhi is not a popular man. Each week brings fresh news of an anti-Rahul rebellion, and the narrative remains pretty much the same: Helpless Sonia fails to hold together leaders angry at clueless Rahul; Congress party implosion imminent. (We at Firstpost have served up numerous examples of the same here, here and here) In the midst of this constant doomsday-mongering then, it is refreshing to stumble upon someone who has a completely different view of the same set of rather dire circumstances, as does Rajesh Ramachandran in the Economic Times. <a href=http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/38887183.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&amp;utm_medium=text&amp;utm_campaign=cppst%20 target=_blank>His column\'s title</a>, Will Rahul Gandhi get his mojo back? is a bit misleading as it is unclear whether Rahul everfound his mojo at any point of his long but rocky career -- except perhaps the very early honeymoon period when he first became an MP. But titles aside, the column does offer two important departures from the now staple Rahul narrative. One, there is a genuine ideological difference between Rahul and the Congress leadership. This isn\'t just a matter of naive Rahul being led by the nose by his \'NGO-type\' advisers. There was good reason why he recently held his own organizational review without inviting the usual suspects on board, argues Ramachandran: <blockquote><em>There was no point in bringing them on board anyway because his poor-only agenda would have never gone down well with the traditional leadership. These leaders have thrived on the leadership opportunities offered by the umbrella party. And they firmly believe that Congress\' success lies in being everything for everyone, instead of turning it into a \'Dalit-minority-poor\' party. So, the leaders have all shuttered their shops and have gone into some sort of a hibernation.</em></blockquote> The column takes a far more cynical view of Rahul\'s internal critics, framing them as career politicians whose \'rebellion\' is really an unseemly power grab for the chief minister post, be it in Assam or Maharashtra. None of them are quite as concerned about the Lok Sabha results as they pretend to be, writes Ramachandran: Congressmen without power are like retired faujis. If they don\'t join some other job, they just sleep off their hangover waiting for their next round of burrapegs and pension. [caption id=attachment_1630607 align=alignleft width=380 View full gallery
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