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Kevin Pietersen

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By Chetan Narula at Lord's: Ben Stokes bowled the 17th over on day one of this second Test at Lord's. Cheteshwar Pujara was on strike to Stokes, looking to leave as many deliveries as possible. Four slips were in place, with a gully, fine leg, a fielder at extra cover and one at a mid-wicket, both in slightly aggressive positions hoping to catch anything that could come their way. There was one odd field placing though - deep square leg. Stokes bowled five deliveries outside off and Pujara let them all go. The sixth one nipped in and the batsman played on the legside but missed. If he had connected, it could have gone for four but for that fielder. At 34/1, on a green-top wicket unlike any in recent memory, the Indians were not in any hurry to score. At this early juncture in the game, it was simply astonishing to see that fielder in the deep. It wasn't the only absurd point of the morning session. For the first nine overs, James Anderson and Stuart Broad did not bowl one delivery that would have gone on to the hit the stumps. Not one, and the only wicket they got in this interim, that of Shikhar Dhawan was down to some great away swing from Anderson. It was no surprise that Alastair Cook opted to bowl first on this pitch. Even if it flattened out after 20 overs - as Kevin Pietersen so vehemently tweeted - anyone would take that chance and try to blow the opposition away with the new ball. More than anything, England had been crying out loud for such a wicket all summer, after three placid tracks in three Tests.

<strong>By Chetan Narula at Lord\'s:</strong> Ben Stokes bowled the 17th over on day one of this second Test at Lord\'s. Cheteshwar Pujara was on strike to Stokes, looking to leave as many deliveries as possible. Four slips were in place, with a gully, fine leg, a fielder at extra cover and one at a mid-wicket, both in slightly aggressive positions hoping to catch anything that could come their way. There was one odd field placing though - deep square leg. Stokes bowled five deliveries outside off and Pujara let them all go. The sixth one nipped in and the batsman played on the legside but missed. If he had connected, it could have gone for four but for that fielder. At 34/1, on a green-top wicket unlike any in recent memory, the Indians were not in any hurry to score. At this early juncture in the game, it was simply astonishing to see that fielder in the deep. It wasn\'t the only absurd point of the morning session. For the first nine overs, James Anderson and Stuart Broad did not bowl one delivery that would have gone on to the hit the stumps. Not one, and the only wicket they got in this interim, that of Shikhar Dhawan was down to some great away swing from Anderson. It was no surprise that Alastair Cook opted to bowl first on this pitch. Even if it flattened out after 20 overs - as Kevin Pietersen so vehemently tweeted - anyone would take that chance and try to blow the opposition away with the new ball. More than anything, England had been crying out loud for such a wicket all summer, after three placid tracks in three Tests. [caption id=attachment_1624329 align=alignleft width=380 View full gallery
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