Corsair TX750M Review

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As more users start assembling gaming PCs and enthusiast rigs, there’s an increasing demand for power. A good 400W PSU can easily power a quad-core processor with a basic graphics card with a hard drive or two. When it’s time to power two mid-range graphics cards, a couple of hard drives and a high-end 6-core processor, there’s a need for a high-capacity power supply. But not everyone is willing to spend Rs.10,000 on a massive one. Corsair’s new TX750M is what its name suggests - a 750W power supply. 

 

Features

The Corsair TX750M is advertised as an enthusiast series modular power supply that’s 80 Plus Bronze certified, so it’s not exactly the absolute top-of-the-line product from Corsair. Corsair also has another similar power supply called the TX750 V2. The M in this TX750M model denotes modular. It’s not exactly like other modular power supplies, though - most of the connectors are bundled together. The only modular connectors are for the PCI-E power connectors.

Heavy and a rugged power supply

Heavy and a rugged power supply

 

 

The main bundle of connectors has primarily the 20/24-pin power connector. There are two 4/6-pin PCI-E connectors, included in the bundle. The two other cables connect to four SATA and four 4-pin Molex power connectors. The power supply uses a 140mm fan on the top to keep the power supply cool. The detachable cables include two more PCI-E cables and an additional SATA power connector cable. There is a pair of molex-to-4-pin floppy power converter connectors bundled, too.

Quite the looker, for a power supply

Quite the looker, for a power supply

 

 

The power supply comes packed in a nice cloth bag, which could be used for some accessories. Corsair bundles such little freebies with many of their power supplies and the TX750M is no different. There are a bunch of zip ties, and even a 4GB Flash Voyager - giving it a nice touch. The Voyager is a solid, rubber body flash drive. The bundled power cable uses a flat 3-pin power connector, which may not fit all plug points, so you’ll need to use a spike strip that has one or buy a separate cable.

Design and build quality

The power supply is heavy, made of solid metal and has a rough matte finish to it. Even though power supplies need not be stylish and no one ever seems to notice them, the TX750M is quite the good looker. The power supply has bits of yellow on the Corsair TX750M branding on it.

Large 140mm fan on the top

Large 140mm fan on the top

 

 

The 140mm has a nice solid grill on top of it, that doesn’t flex under pressure. The gap for the fan is large and there are also vents on the side of the power supply that should help it operate under ideal conditions.

Lots of breathing space for the PSU

Lots of breathing space for the PSU

 

 

The bundled cables are typical of other Corsair power supplies. They have a loose sheathing on the top to prevent damage. The quality of the cables is good and the sheathing near the connectors is tightly held together, so there’s no slipping of the coverings, as is the case with cheaper power supplies. Not all of the modular power connector cables are sheathed, though. All the important power connectors are neatly labeled on the connector end as well as on the sockets on the power supply. 

 

Performance

We setup the TX750M on a Sandybridge-E Core i7 3960X processor, running on an ASUS Sabertooth X79 board and a Radeon HD6970 GPU. Voltages appeared stable across all rails. The power supply ran silent and there were no vibrations noticed. There's a very fine hiss, which can only be heard if you place your ear close to the power supply. The power supply runs cool and there's good ventilation thanks to the large vent that's exposed to the outside.

 

Verdict

The Corsair TX750M sells for Rs. 6,500 in India, which is a very good price for a 750W power supply. The modular element of the power supply isn’t as impressive as there’s still a lot of clutter in the cabinet.

TX750M - the modular sibling of the TX750 V2

TX750M - the modular sibling of the TX750 V2

 

 

With enough juice to power, say two mid-range GTX560 Ti’s or two Radeon 6850s easily, along with a high-end Sandy Bridge and still space for overclocking and upgrading the system. 


Published Date: Dec 03, 2011 10:23 am | Updated Date: Dec 03, 2011 10:23 am