Angry Birds Rio - Yet Another Smashing Success

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Love it or hate it but you can’t ignore the casual phenomenon that is Angry Birds. What started off as an addictive platformer has today become a household name spawning all sorts of add-ons, merchandise tie-ins and now for the very first time, a movie tie-in with 20th Century Fox’s animated flick, Rio.

In Angry Birds Rio, the action has moved onto the picturesque city of Rio de Janeiro where the action’s split up into two chapters. In one, you’ll be rescuing a bunch of really sad looking exotic birds from captivity while in the other you’ll be unleashing some serious pain on monkeys (yes, monkeys). Fundamentally the game still remains the same wherein you slingshot your birds across the level to destroy everything and doing so with fewer birds nets you more points. Most of the Angry Birds you’ve grown to love (or live with) from previous iterations are back so you’ll be smashing glass with blue, breaking wood with yellow and blowing up stuff with white’s eggs (yeah that does sound weird).

Death to monkeys

Death to monkeys

 

 

Now both chapters take place in diverse environments that are a radical departure from what we’ve seen in the Angry Birds universe. The rescue missions take place in a warehouse, which really isn’t as boring as it sounds. For starters the warehouses are well detailed boasting of some real subtle yet cool touches like light reflecting from windows, overheard lamps, chains, exhaust fans and more. Besides the Angry Birds themselves, the captive birds are a colourful bunch, adding in a ton of visual variety to the whole equation.

Moving to the jungle is a refreshing change of pace from the closed confines of the warehouse. Levels are once again well detailed with Rio’s mountains and foliage dominating each level. And then you have these highly acrobatic monkeys perched upon various trees and unlike the pigs, these guys will not go down without a fight. Unless you directly hit them or completely destroy the branch they were hanging on, these guys will somehow crawl back to a vertical position and continue to egg you on. It’s not a major game changer per se but it’s nice to go up against opponents who fiercely guard their existence. Now I really don’t want to spoil it for those who haven’t picked up the game yet but let’s just say the last level is a radical departure from what you’ve come to expect from the series where you won’t be going up against a stationary target.

Freedom

Freedom

 

 

My only beef with the game is that even though I purchased it, I can only play two out of six chapters. Why? Because the other four will periodically release from May till November 2011. Now I understand this is Rovio’s way of making you look forward to a whole year of Angry Birds but this is highly annoying for paying customers. While I am miffed at the fact that Rovio boxed me down to just 60 levels (need MOAR Angry Birds), there’s no doubt about the fact that Angry Birds Rio is a solid platformer that provides ample bang for your buck, no matter what platform you pick it up for. 


Published Date: Apr 09, 2011 09:27 am | Updated Date: Apr 09, 2011 09:27 am