Iran's telecom minister claims Apple's ban on Iranian apps will help develop domestic technologies

Iran's minister of telecommunication and information technology said on 27 August that Apple's ban on the Iranian apps will result in the developments of domestic technologies.

Apple CEO Tim Cook. Reuters

Apple CEO Tim Cook. Reuters

Mohammad Javad Azari-Jahromi described recent decision of Apple Inc to remove Iranian apps from its store in alleged compliance with US economic sanctions as a testimony to Iran's right path and success to develop local start-ups, Tasnim news agency reported, Xinhua reported.

Azari-Jahromi said when an arch enemy like the US places such embargoes on Iranian technologies, Iran should grow investment on domestic technologies.

What the US company did lately attest to Iran's movement in the right direction, he said, adding that "the US never imposes sanctions on our weak points, but does on our strong points."

On 25 August, the Iranian minister said his country would legally sue a recent decision by Apple for removing Iranian apps from its app store.

Apple holds 11 percent share of the Iranian cellphone market, however, it has not observed the Iranian consumer rights, said Azari-Jahromi.

"We will legally sue (the issue of) removing of the apps," he said. Pursuant to the US sanctions, Apple has no official presence in Iran. Millions of Iranians use iPhones smuggled in from different countries and thousands of apps have been created for Iranians in Apple's app store.

On 24 August, Apple removed Snapp, a ride-hailing app similar to Uber that is popular in Iran, from its app stores. That was followed by the removal in recent weeks of apps for food delivery, shopping and other services.

In a message to Iranian developers whose apps were affected by the ban, Apple said, "under the US sanctions regulations, the app store cannot host, distribute or do business with apps or developers connected to certain US embargoed countries."

In January, Apple shut down a number of Iran-based iOS apps from the app store, including online e-commerce service Digikala.

"Since Apple takes a cut of all app store purchases, sales from Iranian apps generate revenue and are thus in violation of US law," Apple said.


Published Date: Aug 28, 2017 08:26 am | Updated Date: Aug 28, 2017 08:26 am