Reports completely untrue, Virat one of the best: Maxwell denies attacking Kohli - Firstpost
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Reports completely untrue, Virat one of the best: Maxwell denies attacking Kohli


Sydney: Swashbuckling Australian batsman Glenn Maxwell today dismissed reports that he had criticised Virat Kohli, saying it was "completely untrue" and the Australian team was actually "in awe" of the India Test captain.

Despite nursing a bruised tendon above his right knee and a sore left hamstring, which rendered him doubtful for the fifth and final ODI here tomorrow, Maxwell today took to social media to clear the air about the reports.

Maxwell, who had hit 96 and 41 in the 3rd and 4th ODIs to help Australia clinch the series 4-0, also spoke to Cricket Australia to clarify his comments about Kohli.

"I was asked to give a bit of an assessment of who was dominating with the bat in this series, and I said 'I don't think anyone in the world is hitting the ball better than Virat at the moment'," Maxwell told cricket.com.au.

Australia's Glenn Maxwell. AFP

Australia's Glenn Maxwell. AFP

"A lot of us are still in awe of what he can do on the field, and the way that he all but took the game away from us the other night in Canberra was something that we were pretty much powerless to stop.

"But some of the reporting I've seen today makes it seem like I was personally attacking one of the best players in the game about the way he plays, which is completely untrue."

Kohli became the fastest batsman to score 25th ODI ton when he blasted 106 in only his 162nd innings while India were chasing a mammoth 349 for a win in the fourth one-dayer. He surpassed the feat of Sachin Tendulkar who achieved it in 1998 in 234 innings.

Further clarifying his comments, the 27-year-old Maxwell said: "The point that I was making, and it related more to when India were setting totals and had plenty of wickets in hand, is that the scoring rate seemed to slow as milestones got close, which can sometimes be the case, especially when teams are batting first.

"Maintaining a constant scoring rate can be less straightforward batting first than when you're chasing and you know what the required rate has to be, and there have been times when batters just seem to have slowed a bit to make sure they reach those milestones."

"Sometimes that wins you games, and sometimes it doesn't but that was the only point I was trying to make. I've got a really good relationship with Virat off the field and I've already had a chat with him," Maxwell added.

Kohli has been involved in a number of volatile exchanges with Australia players in recent years, most recently in a series of running verbal battles with all-rounder James Faulkner.

But Maxwell quashed any suggestions that there was any bad blood between Kohli and Australia players, who has succeeded World Cup-winning captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni as Test skipper.

"Everyone wants to play like Virat does. As a team, we have enormous respect for him largely because he goes about his cricket in much the same way as we do. He's a hard competitor on the field but very fair, and he loves to give as good as he gets," Maxwell said.

"Plus he takes the opposition on and that always earns you huge respect from Australian players and fans. There's no doubt that during this ODI series everyone's enjoyed the way
that he's taken on the role of aggressor, and the battles he's had with James Faulkner have been a real highlight.

"And off the field, he's really likeable, he's got a great personality and he's happy to show that which makes him one of those guys that people can relate to," he said.

Dhoni has come under a lot of flak for India's loss in the ODI series but Maxwell defended the Indian ODI skipper.

"I think everyone is unbelievably harsh on MS Dhoni. If he vacates that middle-order, it leaves their batting even more thin with the inexperienced guys they've brought in," he said.

"With four years until the next World Cup, it's probably the perfect time now to bring in young guys and give them a chance to stake their claim but unfortunately for India they can't realistically break up the middle-order like we were able to."

PTI

First Published On : Jan 22, 2016 20:40 IST

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