UP Election 2017: How Lucknow's first-time voters are gearing up for the polls

One of the most fascinating segments of voters who will be going to the polls over the seven phases of the Uttar Pradesh Assembly election is the millenial voter. Parth MN, who is travelling through Uttar Pradesh, will file a series of ground reports on millennial voters in the state, with a special focus on the concerns of young voters. This, the first part of the series, will focus on first-voters of Lucknow.

After she passed her Class 12 exams with respectable marks, Nazia Khan, 24, wanted to pursue her graduation. However, hailing from a conservative Muslim family in Lucknow, she could not find any takers for her desire to study further. But in 2014, after applying for the Kanya Vidya Dhan scholarship scheme, she received Rs 30,000 and enrolled herself in a BA programme.

The scholarship scheme was first launched during the regime of Mulayam Singh Yadav in 2004 to help girl students from economically backward families, but there were questions raised about its implementation. When Mayawati came to power, she shelved it. In 2012, Akhilesh Yadav revived it after assuming chief ministership, and it has been a catalyst in sustaining his popularity among the youth here in Lucknow. With the scheme aiding economically backward families, it automatically ends up consolidating his Muslim vote share and cajoling Dalit colonies. Even though teachers at the Lucknow University say that the enforcement of the scheme has room for improvement considering its irregularities, it has been significantly better than what it was like during Mulayam's tenure.

Nazia.Firstpost/Parth MN

Nazia. Firstpost/Parth MN

"I would not have been able to graduate without the state government scheme," says Nazia, adding, "Akhilesh deserves another chance to consolidate the good work he started a couple of years ago."

Lucknow’s nine constituencies went to the polls on Sunday, and the popularity of the incumbent chief minister among the first-time voters here is undisputed. Even the ones inclined towards the BJP are not overly critical of Akhilesh. They cite the examples of the Metro and express highway while speaking of his developmental work. He is young, they say, and he speaks "our language". “We can easily identify with him,” Nazia’s words were echoed by almost every first-time voter.

Sudhir Kumar Yadav, 22, a philosophy student at Lucknow University put it more colorfully. "Jis taraf jawani chalti hai, usi taraf zamana chalta hai (Whichever way the youth go, that's the way the generation goes)," he says.

Sudhir Kumar Yadav. Firstpost/Parth MN

Sudhir Kumar Yadav. Firstpost/Parth MN

Sudhir adds that the Samajwadi Party MLA in his constituency has been "useless", but "We do not vote for the MLA," he said. "We vote for the chief minister. His move to provide laptops has helped youngsters a great deal.”


Another scheme that is being hailed by the electorate is the nutrition mission program in alliance with Unicef, with which the state ensures the deprived are fed an all-round meal. It is monitored under the stewardship of Dimple Yadav, who has propelled the party's face as a party of the young. With close to 25 lakh first-time voters across the state, parties have understandably made their moves accordingly to clinch the pivotal vote share, and the Samajwadi Party seems to have an edge courtesy Akhilesh.

Nonetheless, Lucknow is a place with its fair share of problems. One of the biggest challenges gnawing at the youth is unemployment. Nazia, who is currently in the middle of a vocational training program at Sanaktada NGO in the city, has been looking for a job for over a year. Living in a joint family of 11 in a cramped, dim-lit 500 square-foot apartment of Dali Ganj, Nazia’s conservative family would not allow her to move out of Lucknow for a better opportunity. However, most of the others plan to migrate to Delhi or Mumbai. Teachers at the Lucknow University complain they are not able to retain sharp students either.

However, the drawbacks of Lucknow, and of Uttar Pradesh, are largely blamed on the old guard by the electorate. Lucknow-based historian Saleem Kidwai said it reflects how astute Akhilesh is.

"He smartly turned the anti-incumbency, at least perceptibly, on his uncles and father during the family feud," he says.

Along with unemployment, healthcare and security of women are the issues raised by the youth. This, and not religion or caste, is what influences their vote, insist everyone.

Senior journalist Sharat Pradhan says caste identities are being blurred in urban Lucknow and Akhilesh stands to gain from it. "If youngsters move beyond caste and religion, it means some of the upper caste Hindus may move towards Akhilesh," he says, "But the Muslims won't vote against Samajwadi Party."


However, a teacher at the Lucknow University, requesting anonymity, says the students are merely being politically correct. "They won't divulge that caste or religion plays a role if not the role. But behind closed doors, if you scratch the surface, it all comes out," she says.

Indeed, the hints are there for those with a keen ear.

Aksa Hasan. Firstpost/Parth MN

Aksa Hasan. Firstpost/Parth MN

Aksa Hasan, 20, living in the same colony as Nazia, praised Akhilesh for the reasons mentioned earlier. But unwittingly says, "We would obviously vote for the party that would protect us." Upon being probed further, she adds that the Hindutva narrative does make her nervous, and apart from the Samajwadi Party-Congress alliance, she does not have an option.

Interestingly, a significant chunk of the Shia vote in Lucknow traditionally went with the BJP. Atal Bihari Vajpayee and his protégé Lalji Tondon, enjoyed respect among the Shias. However, with the increasing paranoia under the Narendra Modi government, Shia Muslims are drifting away from the BJP. But with the Shia and Sunni Ulemas being at loggerheads with each other, Kidwai says the Shias are not likely to shift en masse towards the Samajwadi Party-Congress alliance. "The Shia Ulema has declared its support to Mayawati," he says, "The devout Shias will listen to him. But the moderate ones and especially young, who are in larger numbers, will move towards Akhilesh."

Amidst the interactions, the name of Rahul Gandhi hardly comes up. When specifically mentioned, youngsters say they hope he does not interfere with Akhilesh's work. The sentiment within Akhilesh supporters regarding the alliance is similar to what avid Nitish Kumar followers said in Bihar. They did not like the idea of collaborating with Lalu Prasad Yadav, but were not angry enough to desert him.

Mayawati, on the other hand, is lagging behind in spite of a sizable 20 percent Dalit population in Lucknow because the urban Dalit, especially the youth, is not exactly homogeneous. While even the quintessential voters of Samajwadi Party saying the law and order had been better under Mayawati, they believe voting for her in the urban region would benefit the BJP considering the manner in which the elections appear to be panning out. In rural Lucknow, however, the Dalits, including youngsters, say their preferred choice is "hathi in the state and kamal at the Centre".

With Shia votes and around 30 perct of the upper caste population, BJP has always done well in Lucknow. The party has held the Lok Sabha seat since 1991, and in 2014, the BJP won it hands down.

The Shias might be moving away, but the majority of upper castes side with the BJP. Their loyalty has been fortified after the arrival of Modi, who remains a charismatic personality among a section of the youth. Prerna Shrivastava, a 20-year-old commerce student, says it does not matter if the BJP has not revealed its chief ministerial candidate. "Whoever Modiji appoints, it will be for the best of Uttar Pradesh," she says, "He is a gutsy leader. The way he took on the black money is commendable."

Prerna Shrivastava. Firstpost/Parth MN

Prerna Shrivastava. Firstpost/Parth MN

Prerna says she is most impressed with BJP’s social media campaign that has played a role in influencing her. She adds that her family has been supporting BJP for generations. Mohit Trivedi, a cabbie in his mid-20s, is less cagey. After praising Akhilesh for around 15 minutes, he says he favours the BJP.

Upon being asked why, he simply says, "Hum Pandithain."

Read the other reports in this series:

II. In Sonia Gandhi's adopted Udwa village, millennials are impressed with Modi's 'audaciousness'

III. In VIP constituency of Raebareli, millennial voters vexed with Congress, inclined to vote for Akhilesh

IV. In Amethi, millennial voters are looking beyond Rahul Gandhi


Published Date: Feb 26, 2017 11:29 am | Updated Date: Feb 26, 2017 11:29 am



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