Govt rules out special session to clear SC/ST bill

by   Sep 7, 2012 19:43 IST

#Mayawati   #parliament   #Pawan Kumar Bansal   #PoliticalPlay   #quota  

New Delhi: The government today ruled out the possibility of a special session of Parliament to clear the Bill for reservation in promotions for SC/ST employees as demanded by Mayawati saying there is no promise by parties to end the logjam.

"I have also seen the demand in media. There is no such demand (by any political party) before me. If all parties had come together promising to end the logjam in Parliament and agreed to complete the pending business, we would have possibly extended the session.

"This did not happen. If such a small session was sacrificed due to whims and fancies, then there is no reason to call for any special session," Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pawan Kumar Bansal told reporters.

Parliament of India. Reuters

Terming the Congress-led UPA Government as "anti-dalit", the BSP earlier demanded that a special session of Parliament should be called this month to clear the Bill for reservation in promotions for SC/ST employees.

"We have requested the Centre to call a special session of Parliament this month to get this Bill cleared but before that the Government should ensure that the House will function smoothly," BSP supremo Mayawati told reporters as soon as Parliament was adjourned sine die.

The BSP had on Thursday sought an extension of the Monsoon session by 10-12 days to get the Bill cleared.

The Janata Dal-United president Sharad Yadav, who is also the convener of the National Democratic Alliance, however, disagreed with the demand.

"There is a deadlock between the NDA and the UPA (United Progressive Alliance). As long as this deadlock is not resolved, there is no point in calling any special session of Parliament or extending it," he said.

Bansal said that disruptions caused were to the tune of 77 and 72 percent of the time of the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha in the month-long session at a time when each minute of running Parliament costs Rs 2.5 lakh.

Dismissing suggestions that running Parliament was the job of the government, Bansal said, "There is no responsibility that was not discharged by government.... You cannot enforce rules against an unruly mob or group."

He said "asking for the resignation of the prime minister is asking the government to go".

The minister was unfazed by BJP's plans to take the battle on the issue from Parliament to the street saying, "For so many days, they reduced Parliament to a street. Now they want to hit the street. We will also expose their bundle of lies before the people."

In a veiled reference to the mining scam in BJP-ruled Karnataka, Bansal said, "There are other mines also costlier than coal. Like iron ore in which there is much greater involvement. You all know from where did they get patronage. BJP has much to answer."

Urging the BJP to realise that enough is enough, the Union Minister said, "Parliament should not be taken to 11 Ashoka Road (BJP's office) or television studios. Allow Parliament to function in Parliament office."

Taking further Rajya Sabha chairman Hamid Ansari contention that the session will be remembered for the work that was not done, Bansal said that the washout of the session has "inflicted an wound on the body politic of India".

Bansal said that Parliament will lose its relevance and significance if only disruptions take place in the House.

He said that BJP's "concocted" argument to give an euphemism that whatever Opposition is demanding is an issue of morality is not true.

"Had a debate taken place in Parliament, we would have demolished their arguments."

Rejecting contetions of loss to the government due to allocation of mines to private companies, Bansal said it is akin to saying there is loss because the profit being made by private television channels would have come to Doordarshan had it been running them.

PTI