Niagara to Iguazu and Tugela to Angel: Most beautiful waterfalls in the world

The tallest waterfall in all of Europe is at the same time one of the most impressive ones anywhere in the world. The melt waters of the Vinnu Glacier rush through a crevice high up on a cliff and then plunge 865 metres downward. The highest stage is 730 metres, where the water crashes onto rocks and branches out to create a curtain of water up to 152 metres wide. Vinnufallet is easily reachable, and located near the town of Sunndalsora, some 400 kilometres north of the capital Oslo. Motorists can see the waterfall while driving the RV 70 highway along the Sunndal valley. Source - DPA.

Vinnufallet, Norway: The tallest waterfall in all of Europe is at the same time one of the most impressive anywhere in the world. The melt waters of the Vinnu Glacier rush through a crevice high up on a cliff and then plunge 865 metres downward. The highest stage is 730 metres, where the water crashes onto rocks and branches out to create a curtain of water up to 152 metres wide. Vinnufallet is easily reachable, and located near the town of Sunndalsora, some 400 kilometres north of the capital Oslo. Motorists can see the waterfall while driving the RV 70 highway along the Sunndal valley. DPA.

The tropical-green cascades of the 20 major Iguazu waterfalls, together with their tributaries, look like something out of an age long before our time. It is easy to imagine flying dinosaurs soaring above the falls. A listed UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Iguazú Falls can be viewed from both the Brazilian and Argentinian sides. A footpath leads to the circular-shaped Garganta del Diablo - the Devil's Throat - where the hiker comes very close to feeling the sheer power of the mass of water. Travellers will usually stay overnight at Foz do Iguaco on the Brazilian side or Puerto Iguazú in Argentina. Source - DPA.

Iguazú Falls, Argentina/Brazil: The tropical-green cascades of the 20 major Iguazu waterfalls, together with their tributaries, looks like something out of an age long before our time. It is easy to imagine flying dinosaurs soaring above the falls. A listed UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Iguazú Falls can be viewed from both the Brazilian and Argentinian sides. A footpath leads to the circular-shaped Garganta del Diablo - the Devil's Throat - where the hiker comes very close to feeling the sheer power of the mass of water. Travellers will usually stay overnight at Foz do Iguaco on the Brazilian side or Puerto Iguazú in Argentina. DPA.

Much easier to reach are the Tugela Falls in the Drakensberg mountain area of the Royal Natal National Park in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal Province. Two hiking trails lead from a parking lot directly to the 948-metre-tall falls consisting of five cascades. Especially impressive is the hike to Mont-Aux-Sources, the source of the Tugela River, and from there to the plateau leading to the edge of the falls. In the dry season the waterfall vanishes altogether. In the rainy season, by contrast, the waterfall can be seen from as far away as the main road of the Royal Natal National Park. Source - DPA

Tugela Falls, South Africa: Much easier to reach are the Tugela Falls in the Drakensberg mountain area of the Royal Natal National Park in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal Province. Two hiking trails lead from a parking lot directly to the 948-metre-tall falls consisting of five cascades. Especially impressive is the hike to Mont-Aux-Sources, the source of the Tugela River, and from there to the plateau leading to the edge of the falls. In the dry season the waterfall vanishes altogether. In the rainy season, by contrast, the waterfall can be seen from as far away as the main road of the Royal Natal National Park. DPA.

They are not as famous as the Niagara Falls, but for all that, the Yosemite Falls are much taller. In fact, at 739 metres they are the tallest in all North America. They are relatively easy to reach, what with Yosemite National Park, located in California, being one of the most popular travel destinations in the American West. The accessibility and infrastructure are very good. One drawback is that in the dry summer season, there is not much water plunging down, and so it is not quite the spectacle that it is in May, when after the winter snow melt there is great deal of water. A hiking trail that travellers should plan a day for will lead right up to the edge of the falls. Source - DPA

Yosemite Falls, US: They are not as famous as the Niagara Falls, but for all that, the Yosemite Falls are much taller. In fact, at 739 metres they are the tallest in all North America. They are relatively easy to reach, what with Yosemite National Park, located in California, being one of the most popular travel destinations in the American West. The accessibility and infrastructure are very good. One drawback is that in the dry summer season, there is not much water plunging down, and so it is not quite the spectacle as it is in May, when after the winter snow melt there is great deal of water. A hiking trail that travellers should plan a day for will lead right up to the edge of the falls. DPA

The Niagara Falls are quite possibly the most famous waterfall on the planet. Yet the height that the plunging water descends, at 52 metres, is not all that great. But the very broad, curved ledge that the water plunges over is what lends the falls their powerful attraction. The Niagara Falls are impressive when viewed from either the US or the Canadian side. There is also a circular trail through a tunnel that leads past Horseshoe Falls, a drop which comprises one segment of the site. Another spectacular view is from a boat, looking up at the mighty mass of water. Source - DPA.

Niagara Falls, USA/Canada: The Niagara Falls are quite possibly the most famous waterfall on the planet. Yet the height that the plunging water descends, at 52 metres, is not all that great. But the very broad, curved ledge that the water plunges over is what lends the falls their powerful attraction.
The Niagara Falls are impressive when viewed from either the US or the Canadian side. There is also a circular trail through a tunnel that leads past Horseshoe Falls, a drop which comprises one segment of the site. Another spectacular view is from a boat, looking up at the mighty mass of water. DPA.

When in 1933 the pilot James Angel flew over the Venezuelan jungle, he espied a river plunging over a mesa into a gorge. The plunge was so deep that the water was vaporized into a veil of mist. The waterfall today bears the American pilot's name and is considered to be the tallest in the world. It consists of several steps, the tallest one alone being 807 metres. In 2009, late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez announced his aim to get the waterfall renamed "Kerepakupai Merú" - the name given it by the indigenous Pemón inhabitants. In order to see the waterfall in the southwest of Venezuela, it is first necessary to fly to Canaima National Park. From there, boat tours take visitors to the waterfall. Source - DPA

Angel Falls, Venezuela: When in 1933 the pilot James Angel flew over the Venezuelan jungle, he espied a river plunging over a mesa into a gorge. The plunge was so deep that the water was vaporized into a veil of mist. The waterfall today bears the American pilot's name and is considered to be the tallest in the world. It consists of several steps, the tallest one alone being 807 metres. In 2009, late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez announced his aim to get the waterfall renamed "Kerepakupai Merú" - the name given it by the indigenous Pemón inhabitants. In order to see the waterfall in the southwest of Venezuela, it is first necessary to fly to Canaima National Park. From there, boat tours take visitors to the waterfall. Source - DPA

From a 1,700-metre-wide ledge, the Zambesi River plunges 108 metres down into a gorge. Measured by height and width, it creates the world's largest curtain of water. A circular trail leads past the falls to the other side of the gorge. But, your attention please: The mists are as dense as a shower, so expect to get wet, and keep your cameras safely tucked away as you walk. In Livingstone (Zambia) and Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe), there are good, and in some cases expensive, accomodations. Source - DPA.

Victoria Falls, Zambia/Zimbabwe: From a 1,700-metre-wide ledge, the Zambezi River plunges 108 metres down into a gorge. Measured by height and width, it creates the world's largest curtain of water. A circular trail leads past the falls to the other side of the gorge. But, your attention please: The mists are as dense as a shower, so expect to get wet, and keep your cameras safely tucked away as you walk. In Livingstone (Zambia) and Victoria Falls (Zimbabwe), there are good, and in some cases expensive, accommodations. DPA.


Published Date: Jan 23, 2016 09:32 am | Updated Date: Jan 23, 2016 09:32 am

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