#SwachhSurvekshan: Mysuru ranked the cleanest among 73 cities; Dhanbad is the filthiest - Firstpost
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#SwachhSurvekshan: Mysuru ranked the cleanest among 73 cities; Dhanbad is the filthiest

#bIhar   #ConnectTheDots   #Dhanbad   #Modi   #Mysuru   #QCI   #SwachhSurvekshan   #VenkaiahNaidu  


Mysuru is the cleanest of 73 cities and Dhanbad in Jharkhand is the dirtiest in the "seminal" Swachh Survekshan results the government rolled out on Monday — a cleanliness monitor based on extensive surveys across Indian cities carried out by Quality Council of India (QCI). Navi Mumbai and Greater Mumbai both make the cut and are grouped in "leader cities".

Image courtesy NeelabhToons

Image courtesy NeelabhToons

Chandigarh, Tiruchirapalli, Delhi (NDMC) and Vishakapatnam come right behind Mysuru in the top five "leaders" which have high levels of sanitation and cleanliness. Chennai in Tamil Nadu just about makes it into the Aspiring Leaders category coming in last among 22 cities while Panaji leads this bunch. More than one city in Bihar is bunched with the laggards, including state capital Patna. Two important cities in Kerala — a state which goes to the polls soon, are in the 'Accelaration required' category.

Unveiling the results, Urban Development Minister M Venkaiah Naidu said "a clean India is the most profound statement that the country can make to the world which is keenly watching us."

Prime Minister Modi launched ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’ in 2014 and laid a roadmap for improving the level of sanitation and cleanliness in the country with a vision to create a Clean India by 2019, the 150th birth year of Mahatma Gandhi. The QCI Swachh Survekshan informs this effort with measurable data points — the first of its kind in the country. QCI and the government invite citizens to tweet their views to @SwachhBharatGov.

Key findings:

Less than 3 in 10 people (25 percent) have access to a public toilet within 500 metres.
Almost 9 in 10 of those surveyed have a toilet at home.
Only 2 in 10 people (23 percent) can locate a trash can.
Less than 2 in 10 (18 percent) people find their areas always clean.

Although cities have been ranked point wise with a variety of indicators and cross checks, these four categories offer a better "understanding" of the results, says the survey.

Cities with a score of 1,400 and above are leaders, those with less than 1,000 are slow movers while the other two categories come within the 1,000-1,400 point scale.

The total of 2,000 points at the upper end comes from three sources: Service level status data (1,000), independent observation (500) and citizen feedback (500)

Calling this a "seminal project", Quality Council of India chairman Adil Zainulbhai said he hopes the survey "becomes the cornerstone for a much intensive exercise of local government and citizens working together for a better future for the next generation".

"A well ranked city wholly benefits from its cleanliness – by leading to influx of the new-age, economically strong working class population further strengthening the economic market of the city," says Zainulbhai, former India chief for McKinsey.

“In fact, we have already started moving towards our next task — even more challenging. It is to make Swachh Survekshan a quarterly affair and go on to rank as many as 4,000 cities and towns in the country,” Zainulbhai said.

Adil Zainulbhai. Twitter @ChairmanQCI

Adil Zainulbhai, chairman of Quality Council of India. Twitter @ChairmanQCI

Prime Minister Modi also weighed in saying: “We reached Mars. No PM or Minister went. It was the people who did it, our scientists who did it. So can’t we create a Clean India?”

Underling the 'objective' nature of the Swachh Survekshan survey, Zainulbhai said the "power and penetration of technology was used to minimize human subjectivity in the surveys."

"The assessors were given tablets to fill the surveys and click evidence-based pictures of the locations in the cities. The pictures were also geo-tagged to detect precise locations, ensuring accuracy and transparency. Assessors were not given the op-tion to amend, revise or re-do the survey unless approved or requested by the control room, on a real time basis."

There are 15 cities in the "leader" category while the other 58 cities get sorted into three other categories — 'Slow movers', 'Accelaration required' and 'Aspiring leaders'.

Other "leader" cities:
Surat
Rajkot
Gangtok
Pimpri Chinchwad
Greater Mumbai
Navi Mumbai
Pune
Vadodara
Ahmedabad
Imphal

Aspiring leaders:

Panaji
Thane
Coimbatore
Nagpur
Hyderabad
Bhopal
Allahabad
Bhubhaneshwar
Vijayawada
Indore
Shimla
Madurai
Lucknow
Warangal
Nashik
Jaipur
Gwalior
Agartala
Ludhiana
Vasai - Virar
Gurgaon
Chennai

Acceleration required:
Delhi-SDMC
Bengaluru
Thiruvananthapuram
Aizawl
Gandhinagar
Delhi-North DMC
Kozhikode
Durg
Kanpur
Agra
Srinagar
Amritsar
Guwahati
Faridabad
Shillong
Delhi-EDMC
Hubli Dharwad
Kochi

Slow movers:
Aurangabad
Jodhpur
Kota
Cuttack
Kohima
Dehradun
Ranchi
Jabalpur
Kalyan-Dombivili
Varanasi
Jamshedpur
Ghaziabad
Raipur
Meerut
Patna
Itanagarh
Asansol-Durgapur
Dhanbad

Self assessment and independent data collection

After the initial round of self assessment, Swachh Survekshan moved to the next round of independent observation and on-ground assessment by QCI assessors. "Survey assessors used maps and simple handheld recording formats and photographs" to record data and visual evidence, with "location, date and time are tagged on all the pictures."

4 zones in each municipality

Each municipal jurisdiction was divided into 4 zones and QCI zeroed in on these specific locations within that zoning: Slums including informal settlements and urban villages, 'non-slum' neighborhoods, main market area and places of worship, bulk waste generators including hotels, banquet halls, weekly vegetable market areas, two community Toilets and 2 public toilets in each zone.

Key numbers in #SwachhSurvekshan:

73 cities ranked
1 lakh citizens participated
110 assessors
3,000 plus locations
1,168 public toilets
876 residential areas

The exercise also involved six measurable aspects of sanitation and hygiene:

– How cities proposed to stop open defecation and integrate solid waste management systems

– Communication strategies on information, education and behavioral change

– Systems adopted for sweeping, door-to-door collection and transportation of waste

– Efficiency in processing and disposal of waste

– Deployment of public and community toilets

– Progress in construction of individual household toilets.

QCI's Zainulbhai said a happy outcome of this survey would be healthy competition between cities and bottom-up change for a cleaner India and a sense of ownership among government stakeholders and citizens.

With inputs from IANS

First Published On : Feb 16, 2016 08:14 IST

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