Yo Ke Hua Bro review: Sorry Gaurav, Aparshakti but bad sisters Shamita, Ridhima are more fun

Gayatri Gauri

Aug,21 2017 16:06 51 IST

The ‘Dumb and Dumber’ character trope has been done to death in movies. Now, in Yo Ke Hua Bro, it meets its funeral in the form of the desperate performances given by Gaurav Pandey and Aparshakti Khurana as Mahendra and Piyush, respectively.

Gaurav’s claim to fame is his supporting role in Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania, and Aparshakti, besides being known as Ayushmaan Khurrana's brother, made a fine appearance in Dangal as Aamir Khan’s nephew. But more on them later.

The five-part web series on Voot tries too hard to be funny. And it might have been too, if not for the forced Haryanvi culture and lingo in this otherwise simple and fun plot.

A still from Yo Ke Hua Bro. Youtube screengrab

A still from Yo Ke Hua Bro. Youtube screengrab

Mahendra and Piyush are overgrown adolescents who have nothing better to do, other than discuss their fantasies in college libraries. “Ladki taadna”, as the narrative describes it, is their sole occupation.

What’s new about this?

They are a bunch of losers who put on dumb faces, call each other ‘bro’ in cry-baby tones and force annoying Haryanvi accents. So far, so good.


In a bid to add a so-called rustic and raunchy sense of humour, the series falters. The two loser characters get more annoying with each episode. When happy with their fantasies involving women, they hug each other and sleep. This of course, invites a reference straight from Karan Johar’s Kal Ho Na Ho, with a domestic help asking the two if they are “lesbians” in the style of Kanta Ben. At one point, one ‘ bro’ even wakes the other up by lying on top of him, under their blanket, rubbing a cricket ball on the other ‘bro’s’ mouth. I guess this might tickle the funny bones of those who enjoyed a Sajid Khan film.

If that doesn’t do it for even a Houseful fan, there are also lines like “Pant khologe to samaan toh dikhega, par mardaangi nahin”. This line is spoken by the unlikely Shamita Shetty, who is winsome with the sweetest demeanour and a waistline which reminds you of her sister, Shilpa Shetty. As Suman, the seductive con woman, she definitely looks the part. So does her partner-in-crime, Ridhima Pandit, who stars as Ragini. Ridhima is the brightest and best thing about Yo Ke Hua Bro. It comes as no surprise that she is quite popular for her role as Rajni in the television series Bahu Hamari Rajni Kant.

YKHB

A still from Yo Ke Hua Bro. Youtube screengrab


The story gets better with the entry of these two ‘bad’ girls moving into Mahindra’s neighbourhood in a bungalow called 'Prem Nagar'. Piyush and Mahindra are, of course, uncontrollable after this godsend opportunity which quite literally follows the famous film title ‘Tere Ghar Ke Saamne’. Now, that errant cricket ball (mentioned earlier) comes into play. A nice, lighthearted sequence of scenes see the ball and the men crossing boundaries. The sisters turn out to be naughty and welcoming. Suman sends Mahindra to her tailor on an errand; she tells him, “Mera blouse tight karana hai." Ragini hops on to Piyush’s scooter to help her get ‘chutta’ from the bank, where his father works as the manager.

This little detail about the bank is slipped in subtly in the screenplay, which comes alive when glimpses of a certain cop are seen in the first episode. This guy is none other than the web world’s reigning superstar — Sumeet Vyas. Known for his stellar debut in the web series Permanent Roommates, his presence here among the tiresome bro-duo is a huge redeeming factor in this series. As Inspector Bhagwandas, he displays a smooth sense of comic timing. Unfortunately, his role is limited to a guest appearance in every episode.

The series moves to a decent end, which is neatly tied up. However, the overall stretched pace of the episodes, involving the constant loser act between the main protagonists, takes away most of the impact of this light, breezy series. Gaurav and Aparshakti, individually seem to be decent actors, but together in their obvious, laboured effort to be slow and dim-witted, they lose the comic timing.

The bromance in Yo Ke Hua Bro has been taken too literally, and therein lies the problem. Give me the bad sisters over them, any day.