Quentin Tarantino's next based on Manson murders has multiple studios vying for production rights

FP Staff

Nov,15 2017 12:38 38 IST

Paramount, Sony and Warner Bros have emerged as the three contenders in line for producing maverick director Quentin Tarantino’s next project which is set against the Charles Manson murders, as reported by Variety.

Quentin Tarantino. Twitter

Quentin Tarantino. Twitter

In the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal, Tarantino’s original producer The Weinstein Company is near bankruptcy leading to a bidding rivalry amongst the studios in Hollywood who are eager to grab a rare opportunity of producing Tarantino’s film, as he is known for his auteur driven, yet commercially successful magnum opuses like Inglorious Basterds and Kill Bill.

In a break from tradition, according to the report, the studio execs were first required to read the script by going to WME offices, the agency which represents Tarantino. Except Disney, every major studio made the trek to the WME headquarters. Following this, a meeting with the director was subject to studios agreeing to Tarantino’s strict terms which included a budget of roughly $100 million, first-dollar gross, a cut of the pre-tax revenue, and the final cut on the film rights.

The three finalists that survived this extreme vetting are Paramount, Sony and Warner Bros, although a possibility that a fourth dark horse candidate might emerge in the coming days exists.

The same report states that in the meantime, Warners Bros left no stone unturned in wooing Tarantino by putting up an elaborate and symbolic show by converting their Burbank studio lot, their logo, and conference room into a 1960s avatar, complete with vintage furniture and cars. The film is set to unfold in the August of 1969, the time when Manson’s commune members murdered actress Sharon Tate and four of her friends.

Sony too upped their game with an impressive presentation on the studio’s international distribution record to the director. Sony studio chief Tom Rotham flanked by studio executives, including Columbia Pictures president Sanford Panitch made a case for Sony being strategically placed for both domestic as well worldwide success.