Movie review: Bewakoofiyaan is pointless, go watch Queen instead

When Bewakoofiyaan starts off, it seems promising. It doesn't look or sound cliched. The actors look pretty, but credible. Everything seems to be in place for a fun film. Then the film deflates like an untied balloon.

The story disappears and is replaced by barely-funny sequences. The characters start going round in circles and when there's about half an hour left, everything happens in a tearing, illogical rush because it's time to wrap up.

It's not as though Bewakoofiyaan doesn't have a plot. Mayera (Sonam Kapoor) and Mohit (Ayushmann Khurrana) are in love and all set to marry. The only obstacle in their path to married bliss is Mayera's protective and ogre-like, ex-IAS officer father (Rishi Kapoor).

Just as Mohit is gearing up to woo his prospective Daddyji, he is fired. Not just that, he's rejected at the interview stage when he starts looking for a new job. Can Mohit win over Mayera's father? Can their love survive his unemployment and her being the breadwinner of their family?

Image from Facebook

Image from Facebook

Bewakoofiyaan throws in everything it can to hold on to our attention. Sonam Kapoor in a bikini, some lip locks, Rishi Kapoor in a comic role, a shirtless Ayushmann Khurrana flaunting his buff torso, a smart Sardarji, twists, a foreign location -- but none of this can redeem the film's lopsided script and bland acting performances.

It's no surprise that the heavy lifting in the acting department is done by Rishi Kapoor and Khurrana, while Sonam is one of the weakest links in Bewakoofiyan. Hers isn't a badly-written role, which is why it's a shame that she isn't able to do much with a heroine who is more successful than the hero. However, the real disappointment is how Mayera's career is treated (read: trampled upon) in a film directed by a woman director who is supposed to be good at connecting with young audiences.

Aside from Mayera, the writing in Bewakoofiyaan fails both the story and the other characters. Mayera's father is a failed Machiavelli who is as menacing and cute as an overweight pug, making you wonder why Mohit and Mayera tiptoe around him. It seems like all they need to do is cuddle with him, give him some halwa and tell him to calm down. Khurrana is competent as Mohit, the boy who you can party with and take home to Daddy, but there's so little chemistry between him and Sonam that the relationship makes very little impression.

Despite their best efforts, neither Khurrana nor Rishi Kapoor are able to make their characters endearing. They're pleasant enough but not a single line or scene is memorable.

And therein lies the rub: with its bland characters and unimaginative storytelling, Bewakoofiyaan is an utterly forgettable film. Neither Raghu Dixit's soundtrack nor Neha Parti Matiyani's flat cinematography lift the film or create moments that stay with you. As a result, the awkward details in the story aren't glossed over and instead become prominent.

For example, Mayera's father sits Mohit down and tells him that he can't approve of their relationship because Mohit files his IT returns late and has traffic violations on his 'record'. The same man wants his daughter to consider entrepreneurs who are running Rs 25-crore businesses as prospective husbands. Because we all know that entrepreneurs don't ever bend the rules or break the law, particularly those concerning IT returns.

At one point in Bewakoofiyaan, Mohit realises he has Rs 653 in his bank because he's been spending money recklessly on holidays and while partying. Why doesn't he get SMS alerts like the rest of us, which tell us the balance amount after every debit or credit card transaction? You'd think that his girlfriend, who apparently works in Yes Bank, would have told him to sign up for that service.

Then there's the promotion that Mayera gets at work, which would require her to move to Abu Dhabi. Her boss tells her that someone else has been appointed. However, they're going next week and if Mayera can show up at the office before them, then she has a good chance at getting the job. Yes, just show up in a foreign branch of a bank and that'll ensure you get to work in a position that has already been filled. Makes perfect sense.

Through all this, Mayera is as fashionable as Sonam Kapoor is in real life, wearing Zara, Mango and Steve Madden shoes in way that's easy on the eye and adds nothing to either plot or character. Since Mayera's fashion-consciousness is a prominent point in the film, here's a parallel to sum up the film. Bewakoofiyaan is like the strapless bra -- a good idea in theory but in practice, pointless and uncomfortable. Ladies in particular, go watch Queen instead.


Published Date: Mar 14, 2014 07:55 pm | Updated Date: Mar 14, 2014 08:00 pm

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