The Firstpost Playlist: Raising a toast to Bob Dylan's Nobel win with his much loved songs - Firstpost
Firstpost

The Firstpost Playlist: Raising a toast to Bob Dylan's Nobel win with his much loved songs


As fans celebrate Bob Dylan's (or Bard Dylan's, as some we know have called him) Nobel Prize in Literature, here's a collection of his much loved songs, courtesy the Firstpost newsdesk. This week's Firstpost Playlist is all-Dylan (and one cover!): as always, tune in, to tune out!

'Mr Tambourine Man'

Really, I don't think I need to write a review of this song. 'Mr Tambourine Man' says it all. 'Mr Tambourine Man' epitomises what is said about Dylan's music — his songs aren't just songs, they are poems with a tune.

— Bindisha Sarang

'Don't Think Twice, It's Alright'

In his typical way, Dylan gives us a song about particulars. He takes a strand of emotion from feelings that everybody may have gone through and pushes it under the spot. The lyrics feel almost uncomfortably real. This song isn't about the tired lover persona who sings the words, but the girl who he sings it for. It paints the scene before a break up when the building decision is finally made firm. She can't take him for granted anymore because something's changed — he doesn't care anymore. And what's worse — he's alright.

— Eisha Nair

'Mr Tambourine Man' (Bengali cover by Purna Das Baul)

The 60s folk music marvel that hipsters considered their idol has finally gone mainstream and won a Nobel Prize for his poetic efforts. Will this mean his popularity among the generation of young generation will fade away? Not really, not when you can make Bob Dylan sound more folksy by singing him in Bengali.

After all, you can't be the champion of Indian hipsterhood until you listen to Bob Dylan, that too in Bengali. So if anyone tells you Dylan is too popular and mainstream to care about, play them this track!

Presenting to you Purna Das Baul's Bengali rendition of 'Mr Tambourine Man'. The song starts off with an ektara and takes us through the song with a sweet flute and Purna Das’s soaring voice.

— Ankita Maneck

'Blood In My Eyes'

More than the Nobel Prize, which some people think is undeserved, the biggest Bob Dylan grouse has to be his voice — it's scratchy, throaty and at times, growl-y. But it's a full-throated, brand-new growl that Dylan offers us in this song. It's an underrated song that deserves love, not just because it's Bob Dylan but more so because it's a bluesy folksy number. It's simply a languid Sunday afternoon in song!

— Apoorva Sripathi

'Desolation Row'

I'm not sure this is Dylan's best rendition of 'Desolation Row'. But the song's too well known anyway to be hampered by this particular performance of it. It's representational of what's best about Dylan — the whine of the harmonica, the acoustics and of course, the lyrics which touch something deep within you. 'Desolation Row' has been interpreted and analysed, verse by verse; a line from it "At midnight all the agents..." was even chosen by Alan Moore to be the title of the first chapter of his Watchmen. The lost souls who form the cast of characters in 'Desolation Row' wouldn't be out of place in a circus' 'freak show'; here's my favourite verse about one of them:

Ophelia, she's 'neath the window/ For her I feel so afraid/ On her twenty-second birthday/ She already is an old maid. To her, death is quite romantic/ She wears an iron vest/ Her profession's her religion/ Her sin is her lifelessness. And though her eyes are fixed upon/ Noah's great rainbow/ She spends her time peeking/ Into Desolation Row.

— Rohini Nair

First Published On : Oct 15, 2016 08:55 IST

Comment using Disqus

Show Comments